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(Sustainably) Re-interpreting the classic trench

In conversation with founder Amy-Eliza Wilkinson of Ashby London on sustainability of the brand (Cont.)

KATHRYN CARTER: Speaking to the trench, in 1912 the Tielocken Coat was patented by Thomas Burberry, a garment that would launch the label now fondly known as Burberry. Much like the famous luxury label’s founder, you chose to launch your label with one mindfully designed garment, your ​Ashby London ​sleeveless trench. Do you feel this “starting small” mentality allowed you to produce and deliver a product that really is like nothing else we see in the menswear market today?

AMY-ELIZA: Definitely! If anything, 2020 has shown us the flaws of the fashion industry and the ridiculous demand for collections that I truly believe are not needed. The timelines for releasing and buying collections has never made sense to me and the creation of different collections every two months is just manic. The pace results in many fashion designers struggling cost wise, or simply burning out, while also impacting the environment through producing waste materials and calling for unnecessary manufacturing.

Re-interpreting the classic trench

In conversation with founder Amy-Eliza Wilkinson of Ashby London on redesigning the traditional trench

With winter fading and spring in sight, the time for investing in a trans-seasonal trench is now. But this year Melbourne men are doing the trench a little differently. Made famous by men such as Humphrey Bogart—who wore a classic Burberry style in ​Casablanca​—Michael Caine and Brad Pitt, the trench has been a wardrobe staple of fashion-forward men for decades. Originally developed for men as an alternative to the heavy serge greatcoats worn by British and French soldiers in the First World War, the old school trench recently received a sartorial reshaping, and it happened here in Melbourne.

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